Browsing: Research

SIOUX FALLS, SD – You hear a lot about the importance of science and math education in our schools to help prepare the workforce of the future. This week on Inside KELOLAND we’re focusing on science and a large grant from the National Science Foundation heading to South Dakota to help grow science and technology opportunities. Watch the full video at KELOLAND News.

Undergraduate students participating in the Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) programs at South Dakota’s public, private, and tribal universities gathered in Pierre, S.D. July 25 to present their summer research at the South Dakota Undergraduate Research Symposium. The REU program, established by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 1986, offers undergraduate students the opportunity to participate in a ten-week research experience where they conduct research alongside university faculty. More than 100 undergraduate and two high school students from South Dakota public, private and tribal colleges and universities participating in the REU program presented at the symposium. This year’s symposium was…

The National Science Foundation has awarded a five-year $20 million Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII) Track-1 grant to the South Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (SD EPSCoR). The award will bolster South Dakota’s academic research infrastructure, improve education opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and drive economic and workforce development. SD EPSCoR Project Director Jim Rice says research in STEM-related fields is important for three reasons. “First, the research that takes place in state universities generates new ideas,” said Rice. “Second, because these ideas are critical to our future well-being, they are competitive for federal grants that…

Sunlight is widely regarded as the most abundant energy source on Earth.  It is clean, free, renewable, and it depletes no fossil fuels.For these reasons, scientists have spent many years developing ways to convert sunlight into a usable form of energy.  Current methods of conversion, however, are inefficient and expensive. Researchers at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion are working on the next generation of solar energy applications. They have developed a method to use visible light for hydrogen fuel production.